Archive for the ‘memory’ Category

Is this the future of information management & systematic treatment of data?

Starlight Information Visualization System uses various algorithms to allow its user to sort, organize and compare complex data in a way that has hardly been seen before (maybe except for Sci-Fi movies). Whether the task at hand is work-related, research or just generally managing your everyday steady stream of information – Starlight Information Visualization System lets you handle, connect and ultimately perceive variables from any complex set of data, in a new and exciting way. The potential benefits can potentially be harnessed across many fields, for instance in journalism (cross-referencing has never been this easy or effective!) and it will almost certainly have a considerable impact on the STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics) – who are used to dealing with huge and extremely complex sets of data.

 

References:

http://starlight.pnl.gov/

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20100903005337/en

 

According to a survey, in 2020 between 22 and 50 billions of devices will be connected at Internet in 2020. If we take a look at these prognostics we can notice that there will be more of technologies connected than human in the world ( 7 billions of humans at the end of October 2011 ) !

The European Union with the Information Society and the Media Directorate General, draw up a portrait of the daily european life in 2020 :

This video show us a world where everything is linked at Internet: your car, your health, your shopping… Every property will be touch by the amazing development of tehchnologies with a principal aim : make your life better and easier !

If all of our daily life is being connected to Internet, we should hope that a big bug will not arrive, because in this world without technologies you will have to do things by yourselves…so hard, isn’t it ?!

Read more :

http://ec.europa.eu/information_society/policy/rfid/documents/guidelinesforuserfidsign.pdf

http://www.iot-visitthefuture.eu/fileadmin/documents/researchforeurope/270808_IoT_in_2020_Workshop_Report_V1-1.pdf

Internet of things is here to make our lifes even easier. So connecting all our things together through internet, we will maybe lose our privacity and personal information, but we won’t lose our keys anymore. 

That’s what Cobra Electronics thought, so they partnered with Phone Halo to make a business thanks to all the people that spend half a day looking for their purse, keys or camera. That’s how it works: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AYXvrZ58SY0

A Cobra Tag sensor is attached to your keys, purse, computer bag, or any other item you want to protect from loss. The sensor communicates with the phone’s free app and will remind you if you leave your phone or valuables behind.  The Cobra Tag is also a 2 way finder. Tap the button on the Cobra Tag tag to ring your Smartphone. If you are looking for your Cobra Tag protected item, use the phone’s application to make the Cobra Tag ring.  To secure your phones data, the powerful PhoneHalo application can be set to lock your phone when out of range of your tagged item.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2012/01/09/cobra-lost-items/

 

Irene Martinez

On the account of this blog critically engaging with the internet of things at the moment, it might be worthwhile to pause for a minute and reflect on how this concept came to be in the first place. “The internet of things” was first used by technology pioneer Kevin Ashton in 1999 to describe to a system where the Internet is “attached” to the physical world by means of ubiquitous sensors.  By now, an archetype example it has become the intelligent fridge:

Now imagine if the same technology used for keeping us updated about our stored foods, could also be used for preparing food for thought. The same kind of RFID technology used for tagging the foods in the fridge could be used in learning contexts – for tagging points of interest and making them access points for informations – rather than opening your computer to go search for that same piece of information? What about field trips? Or learning a new language by interacting by everyday objects? What a profound change of our conception of time and space this could present in the long run. One could store information, essays, wikipedia entries and all other sorts of informations onto physical properties, tagging the world as a museum, designated with informations as a multi–layered interactive space. Inherent in every object would be not only its physical properties, but its informational properties – concerning how it has been tagged, which informations it holds and so on. This information could interact with mobile devices to conduct courses or provide course relevant information.

When it comes to the internet of things, it is estimated that its potential benefits will fall into two categories: (1)Information & analysis, and (2)automation and control. In terms of our intelligent fridge, the next innovation may very well be within the automation and control category:

References:

http://blogs.princeton.edu/etc/2012/02/24/the-internet-of-things/

http://blog.iobridge.com/2010/12/network-and-iphone-controlled-mini-fridge-drink-cannon/

For a more thorough discussion of the potential uses of the internet of things see the article “Internet of things by Michael Chui, Markus Löffler and Roger Roberts in Intermedia, Volume 38, Issue 2. – http://web.ebscohost.com

http://web.ebscohost.com.molly.ruc.dk/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=80538a20-0778-48a3-9de1-d3f23cd0ee8a%40sessionmgr12&vid=1&hid=107

Let me first of all state that my intention here is NOT to discuss how teenagers today are spending their leisure time (although the video could – and dare I say should – encourage such debates). The point here is rather that this odd scenario may not be that far fetched – all thanks to the internet of things.

The internet of things is steadily changing our lives, how we relate to the entities around us, whether they are animate,  or material – organic or manufactured. As a matter of fact, Ericsson has already produced a prototype of a talking tree, which tweets out messages as an effect of registered changes in the electromagnetic field around it:

Now one would think that this has to mean something more than a mere digital conversion of that crazy tree-kid’s nightmare. And it is. New innovations within infrastructure engineering and the internet of things are now taking the first steps of turning whole cities into “living” environmental-responsive organic eco-systems.

By integrating software systems into buildings’ rainwater catchment systems watercompanies are now able to empty basins according to weather predictions, calculated by means of the internet. This is just one of many new innovations that effects the way we interact with our environment. In short, it means that almost any piece of information that is obtainable qua the internet can be utilized for operational and interactive purposes, in any part of the city – indeed the world.

Check out the blog and the links below for more examples of an interactive, interconnected city.

References:

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=how-the-internet-of-things-is-turni-2011-12

http://telecomlead.com/inner-page-details.php?id=5753&block=Tower

http://www.theinternetofthings.eu/content/internet-things-and-noosphere

In the morning you are in such  a hurry. Just right before going out of the house your car keys and cell phone seems to just have gotten up in smoke. The same as always when the dear Uncle Murphy comes across with his Law.  (…)  Ever been there?

What if you could have a control panel on a cloud that could locate all your important belongings as the phone, keys, passport, credit card, luggage, including your dear ones?

Nowadays, the police can locate your iPhone, tablet or laptop if you have installed an anti-theft programme but what if this idea would become adapted for your home, office or on the go( GPS ) use?

If talking in terms of safety, it could be  a bone-chilling experience if somebody could unlock your personal document and belonging locator and use it for purposes just as diverse as imagination. On the other side, if all of the items would be marked by an in-built chip, a higher security service would/should have access to locate almost everything in a much broader map.

How do you see the pros and cons,  and development  of the item locators?

Articol of Megane O’neill 16 / 03 /2011

“Imagine what life would be like if every time you cracked open a Heineken you had the chance to win a free case of beer on Facebook. A new student project proposes just that with ‘The Invite’, a fun new concept idea for Heineken—a social media-connected bottle opener that invites your friends over for a beer every time you open up a bottle. And if you get enough friends to come over, you win a whole case of Heineken for next weekend!

According to the concept video for ‘Heineken – The Invite’, which was uploaded to Vimeo a couple of weeks ago and started taking off over the weekend, the campaign revolves around a social bottle opener. Each time you open a bottle of Heineken, the bottle opener connects to your Facebook via Bluetooth and creates a “Heineken Party” event. Get as many friends to RSVP “attending” as possible, because the person that gets the most people to attend their party gets a free case of Heineken for the weekend. Pretty sweet, right?

All you Heineken lovers out there that are drooling right now, sorry to burst your bubble but the campaign isn’t real. It’s just a student project, created by Max Arlestig and Maximimilan Gebhardt at the Miami Ad School in Hamburg. But let’s, for a moment, suppose that this campaign was for real…

Sure, it would be awesome to win a case of free Heineken. But would you really want your Facebook page to be updated every time you cracked open a Heineken? And just because you felt the urge to drink a Heineken would you really want Facebook to automatically invite everyone in your area to come over to your house and drink with you? Is it BYOB or does the entire neighborhood have to drink you out of house and home in order for you to win a measly case of beer? I’m also not sure about the logistics of the Bluetooth bottle opener.

But despite the fact that it may not be all that realistic, I do think that ‘The Invite’ is a pretty awesome student project and a pretty nifty idea. Maybe this project will even inspire Heineken to start giving away free beers on Facebook…eh, Heineken,eh? What do you say?”

Articols and literature:

http://socialtimes.com/free-beer-on-facebook_b62384

http://www.heineken.com

Saverio De Luca