On the account of this blog critically engaging with the internet of things at the moment, it might be worthwhile to pause for a minute and reflect on how this concept came to be in the first place. “The internet of things” was first used by technology pioneer Kevin Ashton in 1999 to describe to a system where the Internet is “attached” to the physical world by means of ubiquitous sensors.  By now, an archetype example it has become the intelligent fridge:

Now imagine if the same technology used for keeping us updated about our stored foods, could also be used for preparing food for thought. The same kind of RFID technology used for tagging the foods in the fridge could be used in learning contexts – for tagging points of interest and making them access points for informations – rather than opening your computer to go search for that same piece of information? What about field trips? Or learning a new language by interacting by everyday objects? What a profound change of our conception of time and space this could present in the long run. One could store information, essays, wikipedia entries and all other sorts of informations onto physical properties, tagging the world as a museum, designated with informations as a multi–layered interactive space. Inherent in every object would be not only its physical properties, but its informational properties – concerning how it has been tagged, which informations it holds and so on. This information could interact with mobile devices to conduct courses or provide course relevant information.

When it comes to the internet of things, it is estimated that its potential benefits will fall into two categories: (1)Information & analysis, and (2)automation and control. In terms of our intelligent fridge, the next innovation may very well be within the automation and control category:

References:

http://blogs.princeton.edu/etc/2012/02/24/the-internet-of-things/

http://blog.iobridge.com/2010/12/network-and-iphone-controlled-mini-fridge-drink-cannon/

For a more thorough discussion of the potential uses of the internet of things see the article “Internet of things by Michael Chui, Markus Löffler and Roger Roberts in Intermedia, Volume 38, Issue 2. – http://web.ebscohost.com

http://web.ebscohost.com.molly.ruc.dk/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=80538a20-0778-48a3-9de1-d3f23cd0ee8a%40sessionmgr12&vid=1&hid=107

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s